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Soils program promotes no-till, cover crops

FARMER PANEL -- Matt Niewohner, l., speaks during the soils conference. Other panelists looking on, l.-r., are John Krohn,  Todd Buettner, Tyler Foland and Paul Kettelson.
FARMER PANEL — Matt Niewohner, l., speaks during the soils conference. Other panelists looking on, l.-r., are John Krohn, Todd Buettner, Tyler Foland and Paul Kettelson.
Farmers can benefit by paying closer attention to Mother Nature, according to conservation agronomist Ray Archuleta.
About 250 farmers and people employed in various agricultural positions attended a Soil Health Conference featuring Archuleta last Wednesday, Sept. 6, at the Event Center on the Boone County Fairgrounds.
Archuleta said his agenda is to make farming more profitable while at the same time building and sustaining soil health.
He advocates “biomimicry,” which looks to copy nature in the practices and strategies that will be successful and sustainable over time. Key components are no-till farming and the use of cover crops.
Benefits of no-till and cover cropping were supported by a panel of area farmers, most of whom have no-till operations and several who have done cover crops. Panelists were Matt Niewohner of Petersburg, John Krohn of Albion, Todd Buettner of Primrose, Tyler Foland of Belgrade and Paul Kettelson, who farms in the Shell Creek area of eastern Boone County.
See complete story in the Sept. 13 Albion News, Print and E-editions.

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